So, some of us just use the microwave (shock/horror!). Some of us use any old thing sitting on the hob. Some of us like it fancy-schmancy digital with pre set temperatures plus keep warm. And for some of us – only a whistle will do! A whistling tea kettle that is.

Before the whistle…

Due to the resemblance of its bottom half to the shape of a cauldron, a kettle (or in middle English ‘ketill’) was defined, back in the day, as a deep container for cooking, heating (water) or serving food. It was also known as a kettle drum.  This was due to its large base.  Think of the modern Weber kettle grill and you’ll see the trend continues!

Whistling Tea Kettle

If you love a whistling kettle on the stove top as much as we do, you’ll love our collection!
To view our collection of whistling tea kettles, visit Tea Party Girl’s online store outlet HERE

Interestingly for us tea lovers, ‘kettle drums’ was also used as a term in the 18th and 19th centuries.  The term was used to describe a large, informal, tea party!  Guests would come and go at will and savor cakes, sandwiches, chocolate – and tea, of course. ‘Drum’ is thought to have been slang in the 18th century for a cheery, lively party. Probably where thought initiated on the invention of the whistling tea kettle!

Then came tea …

Through the Iron, Bronze and Copper ages, kettles were essential for survival. They were strong, durable, easily transferrable and provided a precious method of sterilization. In China, they started throwing green tea leaves into the boiling water for flavour…

Initially and by middle 18th century, tea in Britain was for the wealthy.  This is because it was imported from Asia and it was expensive. Tea kettles were elaborate ornaments, often made of silver to ‘share equal billing’. You know – sort of like if you’re wearing an Armani suit but getting out of a Toyota, rather than a BMW! In time, the British East India Company imported tea from China, making it affordable.  The more affordable it became, the more popular it became! Cheaper kettles followed, with the copper stove top kettle foremost in British homes. But, the whistling tea kettle is yet to come!

Whistling Kettle

If you love a whistling kettle on the stove top as much as we do, you’ll love our collection!
To view our collection of whistling tea kettles, visit Tea Party Girl’s online store outlet HERE

… and the whistle

The invention of the whistling kettle is commonly associated with Londoner Harry Bramson. It was firstly Charles Coats, however, who sought patent rights in Feb 1888 for the whistle in the kettle. Invented purely for safety reasons he was granted them in April 1889. It was Jorgen Madsen who sought patent rights in May 1914 for the combined tea kettle AND signal, granted in Nov 1915. Harry Bramson sold the patented rights in 1923. And so the birth of the whistling tea kettle!

Whistling Tea Kettle Charm

The vibration created by the movement of steam pushing through the spout produces the audible whistling sound. In physics, it is called a ‘tone hole’. Not always quite that tuneful a whistle. But, it usually heralds the imminent appearance of a hot cup of tea.…  For us tea lovers an always, no doubt, joyful enough sound.

The fact that a whistling tea kettle commands your attention when it’s ready adds to the practice of making that cuppa. It’s all a part of the ritual of the practice and goes along with whatever its duty is in that moment. Solace? Celebration? Plain warmth? Comfort?

If you love a whistling kettle on the stove top as much as we do, you’ll love our collection!
To view our collection of whistling tea kettles, visit Tea Party Girl’s online store outlet HERE

 

A Whistling Tea Kettle to Love

Today you can choose a whistling tea kettle in any variety of shapes, sizes, colors, with some patterned even.  Furthermore, the materials used include cast iron, stainless steel, enamel on stainless steel and also glass. Stainless steel proves most energy efficient. However, we think the charm of the whistling tea kettle is only enhanced with how pretty it looks on your stove top and how well it goes with the decor!

A good reason too why they still whistle in our kitchen today is most likely the evocation of many a warm childhood memory. And so we wait with practised anticipation – and with all the patience of a boiling (whistling) kettle! Bring on that refreshing and comforting cuppa!

If you love a whistling kettle on the stove top as much as we do, you’ll love our collection!
To view our collection of whistling tea kettles, visit Tea Party Girl’s online store outlet HERE